Graphics A2 Coursework

Economic Implications
Analysis of Product The good point is that it can be recycled and we can plant
Economic responsibility means, we consider economic implications of
Moral Implications Social Issues another tree whenever one is cut.
our actions, including making certain that there is an economic benefit Social responsibility means ensuring that our own and other people's Manufacturing
both to the region from which the product came and to the region in quality of life and human rights are not compromised to fulfil our All processes that uses energy in the production procedure. My
which it is marketed. expectations and demands. product uses big computer operated machineries that uses
loads of electricity to power it up, although it has a huge
Does it create jobs? Is the product really needed? Not really = bad. Useful = good negative impact, because it is wasting loads of energy, the
Developing, making, using and disposing of a new product will have an Some products do more damage than good, example if we use a product advantage is, it only uses one machine which is not needed to
impact on jobs. For example, many modern products are produced by just to throw it in under a small period of time it is usually doing more be adjusted every now and then because it is designed to do
computer controlled systems (CAM), where the outcome is the loss of damage than good. The designers of my product have not used so much the same thing on all of the wood that are needed in making
jobs for skilled workers in factories. As the product is made by cutting packaging on the products just the boxes used for it to be transported the guitar, except for painting. Furthermore, other
the body of the guitar in the accurate shape for it to sound good, from places to places, the boxes are eco friendly as well. I believe than procedures are done my hand, such as the putting the pick
this means there is not much job opportunities in the actual my product is one that is useful because it can sustain a long time guard, pick ups, to see that everything would be accurate,
production of the product as the machines do most of the work. especially because it is a musical instrument. It entertains people even for the painting. So there is still a good point in the
The only benefit is that some of the work needs to be done by hand, whenever you use it especially with other musical instruments manufacturing of the guitar.
which takes skilled workers, especially the putting of the strings accompanied by it.
and the painting of the guitar especially if it needs to be custom Distribution and sale
made. Which means the product may not be a great benefit for the Social ­ Diminishes (bad) Promotes (good) Getting the product from the factory to the place it will be used
local economy in regards to providing jobs. Different products have different degrees of sociability, like mp3s it does would have a big impact to the environment. My product is
not allow users to be sociable, when using mp3s or mp4s you don't really made in America, so the transportation distance is very
Exploitation/Fair Trade communicate with anyone while listening to it at the same time. The expensive, it has to reach UK and to be distributed to
Many products that we buy are manufactured by people who are badly electric guitar, makes you very sociable especially when you perform different shops, all of this pollutes the environment because
paid and work in very poor conditions. Although at the other end there in front of a crowd of people, you entertain them, they know you more of the transport that was used. Furthermore, the product is
are fair-traded products. Here everyone is involved and properly paid, because you play the guitar, which is very sociable indeed. As well as packaged in a cardboard box but made sure that it is stable
have safe working conditions and often some of the profits are put in it builds character, which means more socializing for people. inside with other cardboard, making the total mileage of the
the community, for health services, education or training. As the product very high.
product is manufactured in America; building the guitar needs a Basic rights and freedom
very skilful worker to complete the guitar, therefore they cannot Every person has a right to basic freedoms ­ safety, care, place to live, etc. Using the product
exploit the workers because they are only skilful workers. For that These are included in the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as Using the product sometimes makes the most environmental
reason this product is not the one that exploits workers very well as right to education, for adults ­ job, fair pay, right to vote etc. As impact, such as cars and places, the fossil fuels used. My product
poorly as some others e.g. people working in very bad conditions. with any other rights, using the electric guitar, provides with different doesn't really have the pollution that cars and planes
things to do with it, such as using it to play in a gig or something for a produce, it's product life is very long because it needs to be
Use of resources job, or even just for playing it for people who needs to be lightened up used all the time especially by well known guitarist,
Many products are inefficient, where there are too much material used because they had a bad day. although some of the parts break it can easily be replaced
or too much energy or water is used in the production. Producing this with parts that you can by from your nearest high street or
other stores.
kind of products causes pollution and makes the products expensive. My Environmental Issues
product is the one that uses the resources wisely, e.g when cutting
the body of the guitar, some of the saw dust are gathered and Disposing the product
Environmental responsibility means ensuring that our actions and lifestyles
made MDF (medium density fibre board). There is definitely room Most products are thrown away and they end up in landfill sites,
don't cause the planet's resources to be used at unsustainable rates.
for improvement, especially for the machines that are on every which can cause a huge pollution. But there are other
day for a long time, that uses loads of electricity alternatives. My product are rarely thrown away its either
Sourcing Materials
smashed (by famous guitarists : Slash) or kept for
Extracting the materials needed for products has a large impact on the
Sold for a profit sentimental values especially for musicians, so it is rarely
environment, whether this is mining for oil or coal, cutting down trees in
A product that sells at less than it costs to make is not sustainable ­ thrown away. Therefore, if it is thrown away it's parts can
large areas or quarrying for stone it all has an effect on the environment.
unless it is sponsored or subsidized. Such as public transports might be easily be recycled such as the wood, or the metal parts that
My product would be made from wood, which are from trees and
subsidized to keep fares down for all passengers, which are all paid are with it.
small amount of steel and metal for its parts, the wood needed for the
from taxes. This particular product that I am studying is sold for a guitar will have a large effect on the environment because it involves
profit, it is not because they want to rip off people, its because it cutting down trees although it is a renewable material, every time a
helps them to get more materials in making more guitars, and tree is cut, a new one is planted. Furthermore, the saw dust that are
because wood are very expensive especially when they need to it wasted whenever a wood is cut, is recycled and made into MDF and
down, and sawed into a right size for the guitar. can still be used.…read more

Many high school Art students (such as those studying AS or A2 Level Art & Design) must present a Coursework or Exam portfolio that shows development. Students are sometimes confused about what the term ‘development’ means in this context, and are uncertain about how they should go about achieving this. This article endeavours to answer these questions and provides a process by which students can ensure their work develops sufficiently. This is intended as a broad guide only, and should be used only in conjunction with advice from your teacher.

If you are told that your work must show development, your teacher is telling you that your work must change a little (both in use of media and composition) from one piece to the next. In other words, an A Level Art Coursework portfolio must tell a visual story: with a starting point, a conclusion, and a journey in between. It is not acceptable, for example, to show the same things drawn or painted from different angles over and over again, or to execute the same composition first in pastel, then in paint, then in charcoal and so on…or to submit paintings of many different items that have no visual or thematic connection to each other.

‘Development’ means systematically working towards better artwork: trialing, refining and exploring compositional devices and technique, demonstrating to the examiners that you have gone through a learning process and arrived at a successful final piece.

As an example, the following process was undertaken by my A Level Painting students (this process could be easily modified for Graphic Design, Photography or Sculpture) during the course of the year:

1. Select an original, personally relevant, visually complex, readily-available A Level subject or theme that can sustain your interest for a year (see the accompanying guide: how to select a good A Level Art theme);

2. Complete 4-10 drawings of your chosen topic in your A Level Art Sketchbook, using a range of black and white and coloured mediums such as graphite pencil, Indian ink, acrylic, coloured pencil, watercolours, oil. The level of realism achieved in these drawings will be dependent on your own drawing style and preferences. Mix and layer mediums as appropriate.  Include photographs if desired. The drawings may be semi-incomplete and can merge into each other. At this point, do not worry so much about what you are achieving in terms of composition. You are merely conducting visual research and exploring your topic.

3. Fill gaps around the drawings with notes discussing your theme / issue / message…why this is personally relevant to you; what appeals to you visually about the subject; how the subject matter might be composed in order to support or convey your ideas. Look carefully at what you have drawn and make notes about how the visual elements (line, tone, texture, space, colour etc) interact… For example, are there strong contrasts between highly detailed areas and sparse areas? Are the negative spaces as interesting as the objects themselves? Are there repetitions of certain shapes and colours? Are you exploring frames within frames? …In essence, establish what you are dealing with visually.

4. Select an artist model whose work relates to your subject matter and inspires you. Research this artist. Complete several pages in your A Level Art Sketchbook, including composition studies, imitations and pastiches of their artwork, using a range of mediums.  Fill spaces around the illustrations with notes explaining/discussing their technique/s (mark-making methods); use of media / materials; style; composition (i.e. the relationship between the visual elements: line, shape, colour, tone, texture and space. Discuss how these elements form ‘visual devices’ that ‘draw attention’, ‘emphasise’, ‘balance’, ‘link’ or ‘direct the viewer through the artwork’ and so on). Write notes about the ideas, moods and subjects explored within the drawings and how all of the above relates to your topic or theme. Your comments should show evidence that you have researched your artist (using proper terminology) and should also contain your own thoughts and responses. Under no circumstances should it appear as if you are just regurgitating information from a textbook. Learn from this artist and establish how this artist is relevant / useful for your own project.

5. Complete 10 – 15 drawings and paintings that show a smooth transition from your original artworks to images that are influenced by your first artist model.

Do not leap in and copy everything the artist does. It may be, for example, that you simply copy the way a particular artist uses foreground, mid-ground and background, or the way in which they apply paint onto a scratched, irregular surface. The purpose of this exercise is to learn particular techniques or compositional strategies – not to copy their work in its entirety. The result should be a series of paintings which show gradual changes and exploration. After each one you should have a discussion with your teacher about what you can do next to help convey your ideas more successfully.

6. When you have learned all that you need to from the first artist, select another artist and repeat the process. Once you have learned from this artist, repeat again. The intention is that by the time you get to your final piece, your work is a beautiful combination of your own ideas and the influence of several others. Your work should look absolutely original – a beautiful mixture of wisdom gained from a multitude of sources. It can be good practice to choose a range of artist models – ie. national / international, contemporary / historical etc…but this is not always necessary. The best outcomes occur when students choose artists whose work really moves them. It can be typical for an AS student to have 2-4 artist models and A2 students to have 3-10 artist models.

Here is a well-developed A Level (A2) Painting portfolio by Nikau Hindin, a talented A Level Art student from ACG Parnell College. Her A2 Coursework portfolio achieved 98%.

 

Still unsure? Viewing our Featured Art Projects will also help you understand how to develop your ideas within your work.

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